Michael J. Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Robert Stuart Smith & Daniel J. Singer (University of Pennsylvania)

Robert Stuart Smith & Daniel J. Singer (University of Pennsylvania)

Robert is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at PennDesign specialising in robotic manufacturing and generative design. He is a director of RIBA Chartered Architectural practice Robert Stuart-Smith Design, co-founder of computational research group Kokkugia, and a Principle Research Associate in Computer Science at University College of London for Aerial Additive Building Manufacturing (Aerial ABM) — an EPSRC funded research project developing an autonomous robot swarm system for in-situ 3D-printed construction. Prior to joining the faculty at UPENN, Robert was a Studio Course Master for eight years at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London, predominantly in the AA.DRL Masters program. 

Daniel J. Singer is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania, and he co-directs the Computational Social Philosophy Lab with Patrick Grim. His research is about two questions in epistemology and metaethics, namely (1) how and why epistemic norms apply to us, and (2) how epistemic norms change when we look at groups rather than individuals. He investigates both questions using traditional philosophical methods as well as using agent-based computer simulations. His current research in the digital humanities studies how groups of people act as agents, and in particular, how groups deliberate and come to have views about the world. The project uses agent-based computer simulations to try to shed light not only on what it means for a group to have a view but also on how group deliberation can be optimized. He also uses agent-based computer simulations to investigate questions related questions in political philosophy, social epistemology, and philosophy of science. Learn more about Daniel's work on his website.

November 20, 2017
12:00-2:00pm
Nevil Classroom, Penn Museum

2017-18 Mellon Seminar Series